Video is the NOW of Brand Marketing

The past week we have been completing online video campaigns for clients and somewhere along the week, we hit pause to better understand how video is changing marketing.  YouTube reports that the number of hours that people are watching on YouTube is up 50% year over year.

In 2013 video consumed 66% of internet traffic and by 2017, video is estimated by Cisco to account for 69% of all consumer internet traffic.   Looking at the marketing side of the equation, 64% of marketers told Nielsen they expected video to dominate their strategies in the near future.

The real strength of video is the ability to capture the emotional resonance of a brand.  Axonn Research found seven in 10 people view brands in a more positive light after watching interesting video content from them.  Examples like Chipotle’s Farm Campaign, Kmart “Ship My Pants” and Dove’s Real Beauty Sketches all appeal to our emotional side, whether it is our social consciousness, our funny bone or our self-esteem.

Probably the most interesting example of the power of emotion is the most viewed video advertising campaign from 2014 that racked up 156 million views.  The black and white First Kiss video by LA fashion house Wren showed twenty complete strangers kissing.  The fact that it was wasn’t obviously a video advertising campaign may have contributed to its 77.8 million views, 1,392,296 Facebook shares, and 68,740 Twitter shares in just 31 days.   The brand reports the video amassed 14,000% more web traffic for the brand and increased sales 13,000%.    Of course, it didn’t hurt that the people were pretty cool and attractive.

Another type of brand video from Johnnie Walker video clearly sets the tone for the brand relevance of enjoying the finer things in life.

We all love video.  We remember it because of those emotional triggers and because we choose to click to play for subjects that have meaning for us.  In a sea of advertising, we still get some control.  In an Online Publishers Association report, 80% of Internet users remember watching a video ad in the past 30 days, with 46% of viewers taking some action after viewing the ad.

So is video just for consumer brands like fashion, entertainment, beauty products and restaurants?  No, in the B2B world,  Forbes says 75% of executives will watch work-related videos at least once a week.   And, 65% visit the marketer’s website after viewing the video. Additionally, the 2014 B2B Demand Generation Benchmark Survey by Software Advice (a company that gives free advice on marketing software), revealed that not only are videos the most-used type of content, they also produce the highest volume of leads.

All videos should employ the best in storytelling.  Research has shown that your audience is 69% more likely to remember a story over anything else you communicate because stories put their brain to work and connect on an emotional level. Beyond brand videos like Johnnie Walker, marketers need to look into the following types of videos:

About Videos.  Short 60-90 second videos that explain who, what and how.  These may tell what your company does or explain how to use your product.

Case Studies.  Short introductions to your real-life customers telling their impression of your company or product are genuine and relate to your target audience.

Demonstrations.  These little videos are life-savers.  They can show you how to do something quicker than you can read the instructions.

Slice of Life.  These videos help impart something of your culture, your customers, your management.  These slice of life at your company help viewers relate to your company and give a preview of it.

Video doesn’t have to be expensive or involve complex production.  We all walk around with video recorders in our pockets today.